489 injuries reported at theme parks last year

Fairground

489 injuries were reported at theme parks and fairgrounds during a 12-month period spanning 2014 and 2015, it has emerged.

The figures, which cover all amusmeent parks and funfairs, were released following a question from the Northern Irish member of parliament Jim Shannon.

It is understood that the reported injuries include all those sustained at the attractions, including those not associated with rides themselves.

They include incidents such as slips, trips and falls in addition to injuries sustained on rides.

According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), 120 of the reported injured met the criteria for an investigation. These are typically those featuring attendance by the emergency services and/or hospitalisation of the injured.

‘Common occurrence’

Mr Shannon told the Press Association that he was “keen to get an idea” of what the government were doing about it.

“The figures show it’s not just an occasional thing, it seems to be a more common occurrence,” he said.

“Whenever you get on those rides you expect to have the thrill and the excitement of the ride but you expect to get off the other end and go and buy an ice cream, you don’t expect to be hung upside down or referred to hospital.

“When you see there are hundreds of reports of injuries to workers and the public at funfairs and amusement parks in 2012/2013, a dramatic fall the next year and then a rise in 2014/2015 back to where it was, that indicates there is still a problem to be addressed.”

Responding to Mr Shannon’s question, a government minister said that the HSE investigated and fed back on all incidents as appropriate.

2 comments

  1. Peter Cave says:

    The balance of probability argument is only sustainable if the maintenance at theme parks is perfect and there is strict adherence to HSG175. If this is not the case, and there is strong evidence to show that it is not, then no injury is acceptable.

  2. George says:

    I think putting some context to the number would be useful. Over
    10 million people visit UK Theme Parks each year.